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John D. Baldwin

Dr. John D. Baldwin
  • Professor
  • FAU Biological Sciences
  • 954-236-1151 (Davie)
  • jbaldwin@fau.edu
  • Davie - DW, 438

Education

  • Ph.D., University of California, Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory

Research Interests

  • Population genetics and molecular ecology
  • Wildlife and fisheries conservation
  • Everglades restoration
  • Marine ecology 

Research Description

Research in our lab stems from a broad interest in ecological and evolutionary processes that shape natural populations. My research program is both laboratory and field-based, and typically explores fundamental questions in biodiversity using an interdisciplinary approach that combines genetics, molecular ecology, developmental biology, organismal biology, and population ecology to address hypotheses of population genetic structure, community and population diversity, reproduction, molecular systematics, phylogenetics, and biogeography. In addition, these studies seek to better inform management actions and improve conservation and restoration efforts.

Recent Publications

  • Green. M.L., Herzing, D.L. and Baldwin, J.D. (2015). Molecular assessment of mating strategies in a population of Atlantic spotted dolphins. PloS one 10(2): e0118227, 10.1371/journal.pone.0118227
  • Ogden, J.C., Baldwin, J.D., Bass, O., Browder, J., Cook, M., Davis, S., Fletcher, P., Fredrick, P., Frezza, P.E., Galvez, R., Hodgson, A., Meyer, K., Oberhofer, L., Paul, A. and Lorenz, J. (2014). Waterbirds as indicators of ecosystem health in the coastal marine habitats of Southern Florida: 1. Selection and justification for a suite of indicator species. Ecological Indicators 44:128-147.
  • Theisen, T. and Baldwin, J.D. (2012).  Movements and depth/temperature distribution of the ectothermic Scombrid Acanthocybium solandri (wahoo) in the western North Atlantic. Marine Biology 159(10):2249-2258.
  • Baldwin, J.D., Bosley, J.W., Oberhofer, L. and Bass, O.L. (2012). Long-term changes, 1958–2010, in the reproduction of bald eagles of Florida Bay, Southern Coastal Everglades. Journal of Raptor Research 46(4): 336-348.

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